Data & Publics: Invisible Crowds

Classmate Michael Blum and I have developed a project proposal for a public intervention project that utilizes data art/visualization called ‘Invisible Crowds’.

Invisible Crowds aims to raise awareness of the sheer volume and diversity of  invisible waves that are constantly bouncing around public spaces.

For this proposal we developed the above presentation and a more detailed writing below.

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The 100: Museum Edition

Prompt: It’s the year 2118. You take your class (or your kids) to the Museum of 2018. Describe what’s in it. What feels as distant from your 2118 daily life as, perhaps, the Tenement Museum does to yours? How would it represent our time and place in history?

Related image

My museum of 2018 would be located on a spacecraft, heavily inspired by the so-bad-its-good CW show The 100.

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Field Trip 2.0: American Natural History Museum

Last week I went to the American Natural History Museum through the lens of a museum/exhibit critic.

I remember as a child and young adult the museum seemed impossibly big. Yet this time, through this lens – and thanks to the dozens of other times I’ve been here – the space was totally manageable.

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A Tale of Two Mycelia

In late February 2018, I inoculated three mycelial networks that eventually grew into the block you see here.

looks like a LEGO, right?!

This post shows the progress of the mycelium, which grew in two separate containers.

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The Perception Test: Higher Order Beliefs

Economics is regarded as a ‘soft science’ because it studies a field that is heavily influenced by human behavior.

Despite developing rigorous models the world depends on, precise measurements that move markets, and insights for how humans behave, economics is dependent on some key assumptions (such as rational actors).

For this reason, it is often a target of criticism from the ‘hard sciences’:

Economists even study how rational we can be with the information we have, a branch of game theory involving higher order beliefs.

I made a small web project to demonstrate the concept of higher order beliefs. It uses memes to make it more fun. Please check it out and participate!

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Make an atlas of the whole universe

…and fly through it!!

First class of ITP (Applications with Nancy) featured a presentation from Carter Emmart, who toured us around space to show you how small and unimportant we are.

You can see a version of it for yourself here.

The atlas is a feat of data mapping and visualization capabilities. It took a big team of people to put together and was met with resistance by traditionalists who saw it as a waste of funding.

But it was a powerful experience, and definitely got me interested in planetary and galactic concepts I wouldn’t otherwise care to know. So take that, lame scientists!