Data & Publics: Invisible Crowds

Classmate Michael Blum and I have developed a project proposal for a public intervention project that utilizes data art/visualization called ‘Invisible Crowds’.

Invisible Crowds aims to raise awareness of the sheer volume and diversity of  invisible waves that are constantly bouncing around public spaces.

For this proposal we developed the above presentation and a more detailed writing below.

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Waveform Mashup – A Self Portrait with Data

I created a digital self portrait in the form of a ‘waveform mashup’.

The waveform mashup is a visual abstraction of waveform data from my ‘Top Songs of 2017’ as defined by Spotify.

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From API to LED: Digital Details

Lets call it CRYPT0MANIA – the connected crystal.

This post is about the crystals digital details – because it works – it really works!

Note: For a summary of the sculpture overall, read more here. For details on how the physical enclosure was made, read more here

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Sunrise, Sunset

Above is a little illustration that depicts the sunrise and sunset times (listed on the y-axis) of two locations in the world for each day in the year (spread across the x-axis).

See the code and web version here (press the play button – not optimized for mobile).

In this current case it is the 2016 sunrises and sunsets from Eastern Standard Time (EST) – aka New York –  and Central European Time (namely Switzerland & France).

At many stages in my life, for different reasons, I have found myself doing a mental calculation to imagine this time difference, and specifically when our normal waking hours overlap.

These days, both a friend and my girlfriend’s father are stationed in Switzerland.

This illustration is designed to show that our days share a lot of the same sunlight – especially in the summer. So even if we are far away, we can often look up at the same thing in the sky. ?

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Two D-10 vs One D-20

The dice theme continues this week with a p5 program that lets you roll a variety of dice and observe the historical distribution of your rolls.

Play with it here (best done on a computer, not mobile).

Inspired by D&D and my general fascination with stats – this is designed as an interactive and informational tool to observe what distributions can be expected. Compare, for example…

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Pull back the curtain

Computational Media is super cool to me for a couple reasons:

    1. Pulling back the curtain on programming and thinking like a computer.
      I have limited programming experience that mostly involves expletives and frustration. I see this class as the perfect opportunity to increase my code literacy and increase the intuition involved when trying to get the computer to  do what I say!


      (when the p5 shape wont move)

      I like what we have done so far in p5 because its a very WSYIWG approach to programming. Instead of having to print() every line and interpret it, you can visually see what changing a function or number is doing to your program. Yet I look forward to the challenge of this no longer being available, just now equipped with a new understand of how the computer works, and being able to navigate the internet for the answers I need more efficiently (i.e. how to google like a programmer.

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Make an atlas of the whole universe

…and fly through it!!

First class of ITP (Applications with Nancy) featured a presentation from Carter Emmart, who toured us around space to show you how small and unimportant we are.

You can see a version of it for yourself here.

The atlas is a feat of data mapping and visualization capabilities. It took a big team of people to put together and was met with resistance by traditionalists who saw it as a waste of funding.

But it was a powerful experience, and definitely got me interested in planetary and galactic concepts I wouldn’t otherwise care to know. So take that, lame scientists!