Goodbyeeeee Moonman!

In response to last week’s presentation from Carter Emmart, ITP classmates put on two amazing presentations that remind me of Rick & Morty’s ‘Goodbye Moonman’

First, guided meditation and a communion-like ritual to create the following projection:

Then, a journey through the history of knowledge, concluded with a song and dance from human + robot:

Great job all around!

Sound Walk: Soundwalk 9:09

Note: This post is in response to Soundwalk 9:09 by John Luther Adams; which “takes its title from the time it takes to walk between The Met Fifth Avenue and The Met Breuer: nine minutes and nine seconds. The composition, in two parts ‘Uptown’ and ‘Downtown’.”

As a former student of apparent local celebrity Dan Phiffer, I am familiar with soundwalks overall, and selected this one for two reasons:

  1. Because of its emphasis on mixing the sound in the walk with the sound in real-life: I mostly use headphones to block out the sound around me, not partially take it in. So this was a unique opportunity to experience the mix.
  2. Because of the deliberate timing of the walk. I wanted to see if I could walk faster or slower than the soundwalk would assume. (Spoiler: it ended up taking 9 minutes both ways)

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Super Mash Bros: The Artists of our Generation?

Note: This post is based on responses to material from The Ecstasy of Influence by Jonathan Lethem, On the Rights of the Moltov Man by Joy Garnett and Susan Meiselas, Allegory to Originality by Drew Christie, and Embrace the Remix by Kirby Ferguson

Turn the clocks back to 2011, and people are engaged in debates about whether Super Mash Bros., the pinnacle of mashup artistry, are really making their own music or not.

It was clear the end-result songs produced by the Bros were ‘unique’ and original from either of the pieces they used. They had entirely different genres, vibes, tempos, etc. But for some it still wasn’t clear whether it was ‘original’ work just because it was unique.

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If a Kickstarter fails in a forest…

Note: This post includes analysis based on material in The Art of Interactive Design by Chris Crawford and A Brief Rant on the Future of Interaction Design by Bret Victor.

To me, interaction is indeed a feedback loop between two or more people/things that involves them taking turns sensing, thinking, and responding to each other (and, alternatively as Chris Crawford says: inputting, processing, and outputting).

However, interactions come in all shapes and sizes, and unlike Crawford, I feel that the opening of a refrigeration door fully counts as an interaction, just not a very ‘rich’ one.

Some interactions are more ‘rich’ than others, and it seems to be based on the quality with which something performs the sensing, thinking, and responding phase in the cycle. But I don’t think scoring low in one of those categories should disqualify the interaction.

Continue reading If a Kickstarter fails in a forest…

Pull back the curtain

Computational Media is super cool to me for a couple reasons:

    1. Pulling back the curtain on programming and thinking like a computer.
      I have limited programming experience that mostly involves expletives and frustration. I see this class as the perfect opportunity to increase my code literacy and increase the intuition involved when trying to get the computer to do what I say!

      when the p5 shape wont move

      I like what we have done so far in p5 because its a very WSYIWG approach to programming. Instead of having to print() every line and interpret it, you can visually see what changing a function or number is doing to your program. Yet I look forward to the challenge of this no longer being available, just now equipped with a new understand of how the computer works, and being able to navigate the internet for the answers I need more efficiently (i.e. how to google like a programmer.

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Spend two hours making a child-like drawing

Hi ICM class.

Many many years ago, my friends and I created a “logo” for our “squad” called The Muffin Men. The logo itself is a muffin that reflects the sentiment of the name: funny & cute, but maybe serious?

You can see one (pixelated) rendition of the logo at the top of the page. For this week’s exercise I created the muffin in p5 and it looks like this:

To do this I utilized the p5 Shape reference page and made the muffin out of shapes primarily including the curveVertex() function to make the curves you see around the muffin top. To make the eyes, I tried a different curve function called quadraticVertex(), which I like much better.

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Make an atlas of the whole universe

…and fly through it!!

First class of ITP (Applications with Nancy) featured a presentation from Carter Emmart, who toured us around space to show you how small and unimportant we are.

You can see a version of it for yourself here.

The atlas is a feat of data mapping and visualization capabilities. It took a big team of people to put together and was met with resistance by traditionalists who saw it as a waste of funding.

But it was a powerful experience, and definitely got me interested in planetary and galactic concepts I wouldn’t otherwise care to know. So take that, lame scientists!